White flight, demographic transition, and the future of school desegregation
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White flight, demographic transition, and the future of school desegregation by David J. Armor

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Published by Rand Corporation in Santa Monica .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • School integration -- United States.,
  • Migration, Internal -- United States.,
  • Demographic transition -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementDavid J. Armor, with the assistance of Donna Schwarzbach.
SeriesRand paper series ;, p-5931
ContributionsShcwarzbach, Donna, joint author., American Sociological Association.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsAS36 .R28 no. 5931, LC214.2 .R28 no. 5931
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 77 p. :
Number of Pages77
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4761751M
LC Control Number78108657

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Title: White Flight, Demographic Transition, and the Future of School Desegregation Author: David J. Armor Subject: This study offers a demographic projection method for estimating the size and duration of white flight and applies the method to school districts experiencing court-ordered mandatory by: Armor, D. J. White flight, demographic transition, and the future of school desegregation. The Rand Corporation, August Cited by: Full text of "ERIC ED White Flight, Demographic Transition, and the Future of School Desegregation." See other formats. White Flight, Demographic Transition, and the Future of School Desegregation. By David J. Armor.3 Santa Monica, Cal.: Rand previously all-White elementary school. The book recounts in detail the systematic, mostly unthinking devastation of two dozen six to ten year-old.

In this paper two tests of the hypothesis that school desegregation leads to white flight are offered. In the first, test data are presented which allow an examination of the number of whites moving from central cities to metropolitan areas for the periods of and In the second test, rates of white migration from central city to suburbs are correlated with school.   White flight -- the phenomenon of white families fleeing their neighborhoods to avoid racially integrated schools -- is part of the reason why black and white students rarely learn together in the same classrooms. But it may not be the main reason, according to new research published this week. Amor's page study, entitled "White Flight, Demographic Transition, and the Future of School Desegregation," was presented Sept. 7 at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. Since World War II, historians have analyzed a phenomenon of “white flight” plaguing the urban areas of the northern United States. One of the most interesting cases of “white flight” occurred in the Chicago neighborhoods of Englewood and Roseland, where seven entire church congregations from one denomination, the Christian Reformed Church, left the city in the s and s and.

Armor, D.J. White flight, demographic transition, and the future of school desegregation. Paper prestneed at the American Sociological Association meetings in San Francisco, September, School Desegregation in the 21st Century. by Christine H. Rossell, ed., David J. Armor, ed., Herbert J. Walberg, ed. Analyzes the history and law of school desegregation, including its benefits and costs over the last half decade, and suggests future policy likely to have a better cost-benefit ratio.   The Role of White Flight. The Peoria Unified School District learned early on the pitfalls of trying to integrate its schools. In , the school board worked with business and community leaders. The book explains how the flight to the suburbs allowed the preservation of a segregated state but the language that was used to describe this movement was non-racial, non-offensive and perfectly understandable to the average American. The book shows how whites learned to hone their language to adjust to the society's notion of what was s: